Tag: app

Among 15 startups pitching at this years MEDICA App Competition, the top three chosen solutions are Kaia, air and iSikCure.

Kaia is a mobile app addressing back pain by using AI to guide patients through therapy and selected exercises which are moderated through camera observation of the users posture.

air is a smartphone app with a connected spirometer guiding users through spirometry measurements. It is meant to be used either by asthma patients or by physicians during patient examinations.

The winning solution on the competition was iSikCure papp, connecting patients to healthcare providers and using a special reward points system creating a new way to pay for health services and encouraging medication adherence.

iSikCure is the winner of MEDICA App Competition 2017.

See all 15 startups pitching at the competition here.

325,000 mHealth apps already on the market

In the pre-competition program different topic on mHealth development were discussed. Ralf-Gordon Jahns presented the latest Research2Guidance research findings on mHealth market. At the moment, the estimated number of mHealth apps is 325,000, with health insurers becoming an increasingly important distribution channel for scaling. mHealth apps still face the problem of monetisation and 55% of apps have less than 5,000 downloads, was mentioned. Full report is freely available here.

What’s the deal with mHealth apps?

In the panel on the state of mHealth apps, with panelists

  • Muthu Singaram, CEO IIT Madras HTIC Incubator & Founder of VibaZone,
  • Klaus Stöckemann, Managing Partner at Peppermint Venture Partners,
  • Tjaša Zajc, Host of Medicine Today on Digital Health Podcast and Strategic Healthcare Partnerships Manager at IRYO.IO,
  • Lars Buch, Managing Director of StartupBootcamp Digital Health Berlin,
  • Jesus del Valle, Head of Bayers Grants4Apps Accelerator and moderator
  • Maren Leche, Startup-Expert, Mentor and eHealth-Advisor,

different reasons for low mHealth apps adoption and user retention were mentioned. An important critical point of apps is that they remind users of their sickness, which can be discouraging for continued use. This is one of the recognised reasons for a lot of B2C apps failing in the last years. A lot of them shifted to B2B2C business models.

mHealth App market assessment panel

Since payments in healthcare are shifting in the direction of outcomes and value based payments, apps are becoming increasingly interesting for Pharma companies offering their patients additional support and value through platforms and apps.

In terms of trends, voice recognition solutions are attracting interest, alongside expectations that app usage will increase with an improved experience provided by solutions coming from big corporations such as Google, Amazon and Apple, which have detailed knowledge about what works in customer engagement which could potentially be translated in to healthcare.

FTR4H is going to SXSW!

Wednesdays program at the Connected Healthcare Forum at MEDICA Trade Fair, prepared by Future for Health Community, was this years last FTR4H event. Next years roadshow includes presence in USA, India, China and Germany.

The first event in 2018 will be a conference program a SXSW festival, one of the top global tech events, attracting leading tech companies from the US and abroad. We are proud to be a part of it as it presents a valuable opportunity to meet tech savy entrepreneurs from different industries, allowing a step out of the digital health bubble and enabling formation of new ideas for the healthcare space. More information will be published soon. If you’re interested in participating as a company, do not hesitate to contact us!

The FTR4H jury (see below) selected the 15 startups which will be pitching on November 15th at MEDICA Trade Fair in Düsseldorf.

Join us LIVE at MEDICA CONNECTED HEALTHCARE FORUM in hall 15, on Wednesday, 15 November from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm during MEDICA runtime including a Get-Together.

Jury members:

  • Dr. Ashish Atreja, Chief Technology Innovation and Engagement Officer at Mount Sinai Health System (USA)
  • Dr. med. Urs-Vito Albrecht, MPH, Deputy Director (Germany)
  • Dr. Jesus del Valle, Head of Bayer Grants4Apps Accelerator (Germany)
  • Harsha Jagasia, Chief Operating Officer at Startupbootcamp Digital Health (Germany)
  • Ralf-Gordon Jahns, Managing Director at research2guidance (Germany)
  • Maren Lesche, Startup Advisor, Co-Founder YourStory Germany and Ecosystem Manager at etventure (Germany)
  • Muthu Singaram, CEO of Healthcare Technology Innovation Centre (HTIC) (India)
  • Dr. Klaus Stöckemann, Co-Founder and Managing Partner at Peppermint VenturePartners GmbH (Germany)
  • Mirko Whitfield, Head of Business Development for EMEA & Asia at SXSW (USA)
  • Tjaša Zajc, Digital Health Journalist (Slovenia)

 

Full program:

03:00 – 03:05 p.m.
Opening of the 6th MEDICA App COMPETITION
Christian Grosser, Deputy Director MEDICA

03:05 – 03:15 p.m.
The Promise of m-Health in Africa – Hope, Hype, or Hustle?
Dr. Moka Lantum, MD, MS, CEO, MicroClinic Technologies

03:15 – 03:25 p.m.
SXSW festival & MedTech – an inspiring fusion
Mirko Whitfield, International Development SXSW EMEA & Asia

03:25 – 04:35 p.m.
Live-Pitch of 15 App-based Medical Mobile Solutions
3 minutes pitch & 2 minutes Q&A each

04:35 – 04:50 p.m.
Live Deliberation of Jury & Presentation of Decision
Maren Lesche, Jury Captain MEDICA App COMPETITION

04:50 – 05:00 p.m.
Award Ceremony
Dr. med. Urs-Vito Albrecht, Group Leader PLRI MedAppLab, Hannover Medical School (MHH)

From 05:00 p.m. Reception & Drinks at US Pavilion in Hall 16
Welcome note by Joachim Schäfer, MD of Messe Düsseldorf

 

Who will be rocking the stage from 3.25 p.m. on?

  1. Air

    Air is the mobile app (available on both iOS and android) connected to our ultraportable spirometer, Air Smart, market leader in the hand-held spirometry market. The Air app allows physicians perform a spirometry test in a fraction of the time it takes to perform a spirometry test compared to desktop spirometers. More importantly, the Air app helps physicians in managing multiple patients at the same time, so that they can better prioritize their work. More: www.nuvoair.com

  2. AMBOSS Knowledge

    AMBOSS offers an interdisciplinary perspective on all medical specialties. Whether providing physicians with information to assist them in their daily routines or preparing medical students for exams, AMBOSS’ team of more than 50 physicians provide carefully curated, cross-checked and up-to-date content. More: www.miamed.de/

  3. Butterfly (Salubrious)

    Butterfly – Your Thyroid Diary is a mobile app for people with thyroid conditions in need of keeping track of a wealth of information to get the right course of treatment, including symptom and food diaries, medication schedules, and private test results. More: getbutterfly.net

  4. Clinivid (Health Care Innovate)

     

    Clinivid is a cloud-based communication platform that helps all clinicians to share patient information securely from their mobile phones and across all platforms. Clinivid has been designed by industry experts to fit clinical workflows. More: clinivid.com.au

  5. Cupris Health

    Cupris enables doctors to discuss patient cases remotely and patients to receive diagnoses and advice from doctors without having to see a doctor in person. Cupris has developed smartphone connected medical devices and a secure software communication platform (app and web platform). This reduces unnecessary and expensive face to face consultations in developed countries, and extends medical expertise to those living in remote areas in developing countries who otherwise would have no access to care. More: http://www.cupris.com/

  6. Femisphere (Onelife Health)

    Femisphere is a medically-certified, smart healthcare companion, allowing mothers-to-be to monitor their vital signs on a daily basis and providing them with medically verified advice, guidance and reassurance whenever they need. More: www.onelife.me

  7. imitoCam

    imitoCam is a system for visual capturing, documentation and communication of medical findings, special cases and the healing progress of patients‘ diseases and injuries. Photos and videos are instantly and securely stored into the hospital‘s image archive, and available in the EMR. Second opinion and feedback can easily be discussed among the team and colleagues via team chat. More: www.imito.io

  8. iSikCure

    iSikCure enables users to access healthcare by matching them to service providers who can then be paid by one of 6 ways – cash, credit card, mobile money, MedCoins, Self-help group wallet or employer wallets. Users earn MedCoins for creating a detailed medical profile, adherence to treatment, ask and sharing medical tips in the app, and for referring iSikCure to peers and family. iSikCure leverages the data in the patient records to create the best match with available providers in a given market, thus ensuring better quality of care.  More: www.isikcure.com

  9. Kaia (US)

    Mind-body therapy against back pain.The app identifies the optimal path for patients based on their individual patient journeys, directs them to the right specialist at the right time, and facilitate self help with the Kaia App. More: www.kaia-health.com

  10. LOLA

    LOLA App is a digital health & emergency assistant for mobile devices that allows users to monitor their health 24/7 and to automatically get help in case of emergency (falls, loss of consciousness, epileptic seizures). LOLA monitors health-relevant factors – pulse, sleep, step count, activity levels and occurrence of fatigue, automatically recognizes abnormal patterns (falls and epileptic seizures) and alerts the pre-defined emergency contacts by call and SMS providing GPS location information. More: www.qolware.com

  11. Medicus AI

    Medicus converts health data with its cryptic numbers and medical language into a visual experience with easy-to-understand health insights and actionable recommendations. It empowers patients to easily understand their medical and health info and see how they fit within their overall health profile. More: medicus.ai

  12. Moodpath (Aurora Health)

    Aurora Health is a Berlin-based technology company developing digital solutions to improve the detection and treatment of mental health disorders. The company’s solutions comprise of Moodpath, a consumer-friendly mobile depression screening and improvement program, and Aurora, the underlying platform to support healthcare practitioners in diagnostic, therapeutic and administrative processes. More: www.moodpath.io

  13. myAirCoach

    An app with advanced algorithms for better Asthma and COPD control, with an holistic overview of patient’s status. myAirCoach has developed a prototype click-on for patient’s inhaler that potentially improves inhaler usage by up to 70%. Observational study is already referred to by the UK based NICE standard. More: www.myair.coach

  14. RxUniverse (Rx.Health)

    Rx.Health’s flagship product, RxUniverse, is the first enterprise-based Digital Medicine delivery system that enables physicians to prescribe evidence-based mobile health applications, multi-media education, wearables, and therapeutics to patients at the point of care. More: http://rx.health

  15. Thinklabs Wave

Thinklabs Wave captures body sounds from Thinklabs One Digital Stethoscope for recording, sharing live around the bedside for a unique medical education experience, remote live sharing for telemedicine/home monitoring, uploading to cloud systems for building signal libraries for machine learning and diagnostic purposes. More: http://thinklabs.com/

“Just creating an app does not mean you have a company. The key key question is: are you solving a problem?” These were the opening words  of Pradeep K. Jaisingh, Founder of HealthStart India, at the VC Panel at #FTR4H program at MEDICAL FAIR India in New Delhi. Panel was organised by HealthStart. The main aim was to highlight VC perspective on the digital health startups scene in India.

As said by Mr. Jaisingh, the basic background of technology needs to be that it improves the outcome. A solution needs to solve a problem and be sustainable. From the macro perspective, potential for disruptive innovation in India is big, said Mr. Jaisingh. Especially in terms of diagnostics, treatment and management of chronic diseases.

The doctor’s expectations in the near future are high. Artificial intelligence can be utilized to effectively synthesize patient information before his visit in the hospital or a doctor’s office.

What do the doctors need?

Private Equity Professional Mayur Sirdesai, Director at Somerset Indus Capital Partners, warned, the key issue in digital health technology and innovation is probability of adoption. “When a doctor has a line of patients in the waiting room, he can’t be bothered by entering data in the computer,” he mentioned. The second challenge is  payment for digital solutions. Revenue model of a startup is crucial to implementation of a solution in practice. In India, most payments are still out of pocket which might change with the development of the insurance market.

From the perspective of Shuchin Bajaj, Founder Director at Cygnus Medicare, a big potential in India is in putting more effort into medical education of other specialists and healthcare providers, apart from doctors. “We are to doctor-centric. I am a big fan of personalized medicine and “ayurveda” in that sense. These sciences look at the patient as an individual while medicine takes the patient as a dataset. Ayurveda does not treat the disease,” he said.

Needs and payments

Partha Dey, Healthcare Leader and SME at IBM India mentioned the need for more collaboration: “It is clear and we agree we need to walk together and collaborate. Technology can work as a platform and our idea is to use it to solve real life problems. We are working on longterm solutions. The first issue is always the business case. What do users need? What are they prepared to pay for? A lot of startups have ideas, but struggle with translation and implementation in practice.”

Vikram Gupta, Founder and Managing Partner at IvyCap Ventures Advisors described India as a unique market because of the payment system. “In the developed world insurance takes care of healthcare. Our environment drives behaviour. Hence healthcare consumption is different compared to the rest of the world. The opportunities here are of different nature than in other countries. One thing to look at is infrastructure. Ratio of hospitals does not match population needs.”  Huge opportunities lay in financial assistance for healthcare, concluded Vikram Gupta.

Top 5 things on healthcare business in India

FTR4H is in full preparations for MEDICAL FAIR INDIA 2017. Before arrival, we talked to Incubators, Companies, Start-ups, Experts… Here’s what you might find useful if you’re thinking about doing business in India.

 

1. Make good market research

India ranked at 130 out of 189 economies in 2015 according to the World bank. 4% of the GDP go to healthcare; around 60% of expenses for healthcare are out of pocket, according to OECD. Almost a third of the population is supposed to own a smartphone by 2019, claims GSMA report. All this goes in favour to digital health or at least mHealth solutions, but keep in mind plenty of good startups on the ground are busy tackling everyday issues.

The country is extensively working on using all the advantages of digital solutions to improve people’s lives and health. Heard of Aadhar? It’s unique-identity number issued to all Indian residents based on their biometric and demographic data such as eyes and finger prints. Nishal Arvind Singh, Founder NASS & Associates IPR Boutique law firm and Legal policy advisor to Honourable Health Minister Satyendra Jain of the Delhi Government explains the plan behind the project: “All payments will be linked with aadhar, to avoid duplicity, promote increase in online payments and disbursement to beneficiaries under many governmental schemes for education, pension etc. This will enable direct transactions into beneficiaries bank account, which will prevent corruption,” says Arvind, adding that in time, it will be connected with healthcare. The unique identification number of a person will prevent duplication and confusion in data management and insurance claimes with others with the same name.

2. Do you have enough time for business here?

According to a World bank report from 2006, it takes 56 procedures and approximately four years for a simple commercial contract in India. As explained by Prabhu Guptara, a distinguished Professor of Global Business, Management & Public Policy at William Carey University, India, a Member of Boards of different companies in the UK, Germany and Switzerland, the problem is the bureaucratic system. It takes years for the legal claims to be processed, let alone enforced. It is a slow system, so brace yourself with energy and patience to conquer it.

 

3. Know that India has very good medical doctors

Top class. World renowned. There’s a reason medical tourism flourishes here. However, as Sachin Gaur warns, 80% of people live in rural areas and only 20% of facillites are there. There are different initiatives to improve access, such as the the mohalla (neighbourhood) clinics. As explained by the hindustantimes, they were started with the aim of taking diagnostics and treatment of simple ailments to people’s doorstep and reduce the footfall in tertiary care hospitals.

 

4. Can you make a subscription plan under a dollar a month?

India has 1.3 billion people, the majority is poor. “2/3 of the population can’t be your target market. 30% of the population lives on less than 2.5 dollars/day, another third 5 dollars/day. Which still leaves you with 400 million people you could address,” says Prabhu Guptara. However, given the number of people, if you can design a subscription model for around 20 cents, than you might address the poorer population, says Sachin Gaur, Director Operation at InnovatioCuris. Taking into account the volume you could reach, it can turn out to be a viable business model.

“If you can design a subscription model for around 20 cents, than you might address the poorer population,” says Sachin Gaur, Director of Operations at InnovatioCuris.

5. Ask, connect to people on the ground

Have you heard of HealthCode.io? It’s a platform for healthcare professionals where you can find people interested in co-creation, consulting, commercialisation, fundraising, mentoring, investing, validation. The app, as the founders claim, already has members from 52 countries, so you might find useful connections even outside India!

 

Be sure to check the two episodes of Medicine Today on Digital Health! Praphu Guptara speaks about differences in the healthcare systems in India, Switzerland or England. Sachin Gaur talks about the innovative solutions in India and problems of digital solutions and cyber security. You can find it on iTunes or Soundcloud.

Future 4 Health - © Mikko Lemola/Shutterstock

There are currently more than 260,000 mHealth apps on the market, according to data from Research2guidance. Whereas this may be exciting news, the sheer number may also be overwhelming for patients and doctors. How can you know what is useful and what is not? One way hospitals are solving the app reliability challenge is by building in-house innovation incubators.

To get to know how that works, listen to a conversation with Ashish Atreja, the CTO of Sinai AppLab at Mount Sinai, in the fourth episode of Medicine Today on the Digital Health podcast.

He are 5 reasons why in-house innovation incubators are good news.

1. Accelerating change

Innovation arms in hospitals are exciting because they help introduce novelties into the rigid healthcare systems.

2. Providing reliability

New solutions are designed by high profile specialists in hospitals. Consequently, solutions are tested inside the hospitals and perfected before they are put on the market.

“I would never give or prescribe medicine to any of my patients that has not been approved in some formal capacity. Why should I prescribe an app?” says gastroenterologist Ashish Atreja, MD, MPH. If you’re a startup, he might take a look at your solution. Why?

One of his jobs as the CTO of Sinai AppLab is onboarding new technologies built by startups outside Mount Sinai. After all, he emphasizes, “it’s impossible for one incubator to do and know everything.”

Ashish Atreja

3. Ease of recommendation

It is easier for doctors to recommend in-house solutions, because they have better access and understanding of the innovation process and reliability of an app compared to the flood of other mhealth digital health offerings on the market.

As Ashish Atreja explains, Mount Sinai even build a platform which allows physicians to prescribe evidence based apps. “We curate the best apps based on the evidence, security and safety. There’s a whole team of people rating the best apps, looking at the published evidence and bringing them to the market place.”

4. Financial benefit

Innovation arms generate new revenue streams for hospitals.

5. Encouraging innovation

When a support environment for creativity is in place, doctors who want to innovate can test and develop their ideas. They also get all the entrepreneurial support in scaling and improving their ideas, so they can reach patients faster.

In 2012, Cleveland Clinic experts designed the Medical Innovation Playbook – a detailed report on the diverse and rapidly evolving technology commercialisation programs of the USA’s top medical centres. It includes an overview of nearly 10,000 invention disclosures, 6,400 patent applications and almost 2,000 issued patents.

Want to know more? Tune into the fourth episode of Medicine Today on Digital Health podcast. You can find, listen, subscribe, rate, follow, share the podcast in Soundcloud or in iTunes.