What will technology bring to the healthcare market in India?

FTR4H is returning to India on March 16th this year. Last year prior to the conference held in New Delhi, we prepared an overview of things to watch for when entering the market in India. At the event, we dived into opportunities in India from the VC perspective, and we also highlighted problems startups are facing when looking for investments.

This year at India’s 24th International exhibition and conference Bombay convention & exhibition centre in Mumbai we prepared three days of exciting content:

One of our speakers will be Pratistha Jain from Vibazone, who shared some of her thoughts on the industry.


“A couple of impediments have stifled the Indian healthcare market; the technology penetration in Tier II and III cities is a challenge due to lack of affordability, cost involved, demographics, income and awareness. The med-tech industry has not been regulated all these years, with inconsistent interpretation and application of regulatory standards being the norm. The new medical devices rules that have been executed this January, the Medtech entrepreneurs will have more clarity and specificity on the policies,” writes Prathistha Jain in her opinion piece on Youstory.

The healthcare landscape has evolved over the last few years. The image of a person getting a check-up has changed; in the twentieth century, the doctor would come over armed with a bag of tools and old-fashioned medical know-how. Some interesting digital healthcare solutions that have been showing promise include imaging, analyzing, processing and computing software with deep learning capabilities, a collaborative space for connecting healthcare stakeholders, telemedicine addressing the lack of accessible healthcare, management tools and platforms to standardize procedures, care delivery, prevention and wellness solutions and non-invasive point-of-care diagnostics.

Digital transformation will have a great impact on the healthcare space. This transformation could be through various new technologies such as mobile (feature phones, smartphones, phablets, tablets, wearables AR/VR, voice assistants) mobile tools and apps to improve efficiency and patient safety, manage addiction treatment and chronic diseases, IoT (Internet of Things, sensors, drones, robots, 3D printer, smart cars and homes to improve care delivery systems and emergency systems, data (big data, smart data, genomics data, bio-informatics) to quantify risk,  precision medicine and disease diagnosis and artificial intelligence (medical diagnosis, robo-doc, health advisor, machine learning, health assistant, new health) to augment the diagnosis and treatment process.

Looking at the trends the future for healthcare looks bright and promising with some minor impediments to be faced through the journey.

Read the full story HERE.

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